ISONblog

  • November 5, 2013

    "Great Comets From Humble Origins & Eyes on ISON": A Public Lecture by Dr. Summers

    by Tracy Vogel

    UPDATE: Here's the talk! Enjoy!

     

    UPDATE: Our apologies. Due to technical issues, the talk was not recorded. We are looking into alternate ways of making it available.

     

    Hubble astrophysicist and guest blogger Dr. Frank Summers will be focusing on comets and ISON tonight at 8 p.m. EDT in his Baltimore-area Public Lecture Series. But you don't have to be local to watch -- the talk will be livecast over the following link.
     

    Please note that the video will be broadcast throught the duration of the talk, but the recorded video will not be made available until the next day, Nov. 6. If you can't watch live, just stop by later to enjoy the archived lecture. The archived talk will be a the same link as the livecast.

     

    Here's the info!

    Great Comets From Humble Origins & Eyes on ISON

    Comets can be one of the most amazing sights in the heavens, with naked-eye bright comas and tails stretching across half the sky. The most spectacular comet appearances are called "great" comets, but such an occurrence is infrequent enough that it is also nicknamed a "comet of the century". In preparation for the Thanksgiving Day perihelion passage of Comet ISON, along with its great possibilities, it's a proper time to examine the humble origins, from the most rural parts of the solar system, of these briefly blazing celestial visitors.

    Lectures on a diverse selection of cosmic topics are held the first Tuesday of every month at 8 PM in the STScI Auditorium, located at 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, Md., on the Homewood campus of Johns Hopkins University. Admission is free and free parking is available in the lot across the street.

    This lecture will be webcast live. The recorded webcast will also be available for viewing online the following day. To view the webcast, you may need to download and install software. See the website in advance for details.

    Further information and directions are available by calling 410-338-4700.