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News Release Archive:

News Release 797 of 939

January 10, 1995 05:00 PM (EST)

News Release Number: STScI-1995-02

Hubble Views a Starry Ring World Born in a Head-On Collision

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Image: The Cartwheel Galaxy: A Starry Ring World Born in a Head-On Collision

The Cartwheel Galaxy: A Starry Ring World Born in a Head-On CollisionSTScI-PRC1995-02

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ABOUT THIS IMAGE:

[Right] - A rare and spectacular head-on collision between two galaxies appears in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope true-color image of the Cartwheel Galaxy, located 500 million light-years away in the constellation Sculptor. The new details of star birth resolved by Hubble provide an opportunity to study how extremely massive stars are born in large fragmented gas clouds.

The striking ring-like feature is a direct result of a smaller intruder galaxy — possibly one of two objects to the right of the ring — that careened through the core of the host galaxy. Like a rock tossed into a lake, the collision sent a ripple of energy into space, plowing gas and dust in front of it. Expanding at 200,000 miles per hour, this cosmic tsunami leaves in its wake a firestorm of new star creation. Hubble resolves bright blue knots that are gigantic clusters of newborn stars and immense loops and bubbles blown into space by exploding stars (supernovae) going off like a string of firecrackers.

The Cartwheel Galaxy presumably was a normal spiral galaxy like our Milky Way before the collision. This spiral structure is beginning to re-emerge, as seen in the faint arms or spokes between the outer ring and bulls-eye shaped nucleus. The ring contains at least several billion new stars that would not normally have been created in such a short time span and is so large (150,000 light-years across) our entire Milky Way Galaxy would fit inside.

Hubble's new view does not solve the mystery as to which of the two small galaxies might have been the intruder. The blue galaxy is disrupted and has new star formation which strongly suggests it is the interloper. However, the smoother-looking companion has no gas, which is consistent with the idea that gas was stripped out of it during passage through the Cartwheel Galaxy.

[Top Left] - Hubble's detailed view shows the knot-like structure of the ring, produced by large clusters of new star formation. Hubble also resolves the effects of thousands of supernovae on the ring structure. One flurry of explosions blew a hole in the ring and formed a giant bubble of hot gas. Secondary star formation on the edge of this bubble appears as an arc extending beyond the ring.

[Bottom Left] - Hubble resolves remarkable new detail in the galaxy's core. The reddish color of this region indicates that it contains a tremendous amount of dust and embedded star formation. Bright pinpoints of light are gigantic young star clusters.

The picture was taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 on October 16, 1994. It is a combination of two images, taken in blue and near-infrared light.

Object Name: Cartwheel Galaxy

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: Kirk Borne (STScI), and NASA

NEWS RELEASE IMAGES

The above montage includes these images:

Cartwheel Galaxy Image Type: Astronomical Cartwheel Galaxy Cartwheel Galaxy Image Close-up Image Type: Astronomical Cartwheel Galaxy Image Close-up Cartwheel Galaxy Image Close-up Image Type: Astronomical Cartwheel Galaxy Image Close-up

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