Share

News Release Archive:

News Release 650 of 938

October 8, 1998 11:00 AM (EDT)

News Release Number: STScI-1998-32

Hubble Goes to the Limit In Search Of Farthest Galaxies

Back

Image: A Spiral Galaxy From the Hubble Deep Field in Visible (left) and Infrared Light (right)

A Spiral Galaxy From the Hubble Deep Field in Visible (left) and Infrared Light (right)STScI-PRC1998-32b

Screen-use options: These files are created for viewing on your monitor

Print-use download options: These files are designed to fit on letter-size paper


ABOUT THIS IMAGE:

A galaxy can look quite different in visible vs infrared light. This is a comparison view of a spiral galaxy in the Hubble Deep Field — Hubble Space Telescope's view of the faintest galaxies ever seen in the universe.

The galaxy is disk-shaped like our Milky Way and tilted obliquely along our line of sight. It is located in the constellation Ursa Major. The smaller clumps in the picture are likely other galaxies.

[Left] In the visible-light picture, taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) in 1995, the galaxy looks uncharacteristically lumpy. That's because only the bright blue knots of starbirth are detected by the WFPC2.

[Right] The underlying disk structure, containing older stars, is seen clearly in this infrared Deep Field image taken with Hubble's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) in January 1998.

These types of comparative observations will help astronomers better understand the evolution of galaxies.

Object Name: HDF-N

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: Rodger I. Thompson (University of Arizona) and NASA

NEWS RELEASE IMAGES

The above montage includes these images:

Hubble Deep Field Galaxy in Visible Light Image Type: Astronomical Hubble Deep Field Galaxy in Visible Light Hubble Deep Field Galaxy in Infrared Light Image Type: Astronomical Hubble Deep Field Galaxy in Infrared Light

All images from this news release:

To access available information and downloadable versions of images in this news release, click on any of the images below: