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News Release Archive:

News Release 107 of 964

October 25, 2012 01:00 PM (EDT)

News Release Number: STScI-2012-24

Monster Galaxy May Have Been Stirred Up By Black-hole Mischief

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Image: Monster Galaxy Lacks a Bright Core

Monster Galaxy Lacks a Bright CoreSTScI-PRC2012-24

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ABOUT THIS IMAGE:

The giant elliptical galaxy in the center of this image, taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, is the most massive and brightest member of the galaxy cluster Abell 2261.

Spanning a little more than one million light-years, the galaxy is about 10 times the diameter of our Milky Way galaxy. The bloated galaxy is a member of an unusual class of galaxies with a diffuse core filled with a fog of starlight. Normally, astronomers would expect to see a concentrated peak of light around a central black hole. The Hubble observations revealed that the galaxy's puffy core, measuring about 10,000 light-years, is the largest yet seen.

The observations present a mystery, and studies of this galaxy may provide insight into how black hole behavior may shape the cores of galaxies.

Astronomers used Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 to measure the amount of starlight across the galaxy, dubbed A2261-BCG. Abell 2261 is located three billion light-years away.

The observations were taken March to May 2011. The Abell 2261 cluster is part of a multi-wavelength survey called the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH).

Object Names: Abell 2261, A2261-BCG

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Postman (STScI), T. Lauer (NOAO), and the CLASH team

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